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the charges, miranda rights, the public safety exemption, where are we right now on that issue? >> well, the normal rule is that when someone's irsed, they're advised of their rights. you have the right to remain silent. anything you say can be used against you. you have the right to a lawyer. if you can't afford one it will be provided, that sort of thing. if police don't give that warning then they cannot use any statements of the defendant in court. the exception to that is called the public safety exception. it's been extended by judges to terrorism cases. and the idea is that if you need information quickly to preserve public safety, you can ask those questions and still use the responses in court. but that public safety exception rule is limited. it only applies for several hours after fill in the blank. we assume after questioning starts rather than after arrest. probably no more than a day, day and a half. >> where do you come up with that? pete, let me interrupt you there. who has come up with what is the time? is it just, you know it when you see it? >> in terms of the time li
to the miranda rule. they've not advised him of his rights. so they can only ask about potential threats to public safety. were there other conspirators, other bombs out there, any reason to believe that public safety is in any way jeopardized. >> pete, one of the persons cited in terms of this idea that there may have been more violent plans on order at the hands of the brothers is this person who was hijacked by the brothers on thursday night. and the driver of a mercedes suv. we know that he's been cooperating with police. is there anything else that we know about his involvement in all of this? >> yeah, the business about new york is very iffy, frankly. i've emailed briefly with this person. he claims that he escaped with they stopped at a gasoline station. but he's also told the police that he was told by these two men, that they were the marathon bombers. but that they were not going to kill him because he was not an american. what he told the police was, that he thought they were speaking arabic. that's probably not the case, they were probably speaking russian or some dialect. an
miranda rights to keep him in a gray area right now whether or not he would be considered an enemy combatant or information that he would be allowing to investigators may not be used against him if he were try to be tried as an american civilian. as i talked there with roger about the fact that congressman peter king over the weekend said the homeland is the battlefield and that times have really changed, what are your thoughts about what the congressman has said about the fbi and that they may have missed red flags and the fact that the homeland is the battlefield? >> as you know, thomas, the fbi conducts thousands of interviews like this. i will say that they do a good job. i would say unless there was some evidence that would lead them to not do something to this individual, i would say they did a good job. i think my colleague, peter king, is not just monday morning quarterbacking but arm chair quarterbacking. we don't no what our investigative authorities know. i would say let them do their job. we can comment but when we start pointing fingers, i think we just add to the conf
him before he receives miranda warning is the right thing to do. a short time ago, the aclu put out a statement saying every defendant is entitled to defend miranda lights. five lawmakers want him treated as an enemy combatant. 53 people remain in boston hospitals today, three in critical condition, including a 7-year-old girl. nbc news national investigative correspondent michaels i cough is in boston, ron allen outside boston's beth israel medical center where the suspect and many of the victims are being kept and kristen we willinger at the white house, let's get to the latest on investigation. for that, we turn to michaels i cough, again, in boston. what is the fbi focusing on today and moving forward? >> reporter: federal prosecutors are focusing on drafting a criminal complaint we could see as early as this afternoon, detailing the criminal charges against him supported by an affidavit from an fbi agent that would lay out some details of the plot. not all of them but could provide crucial new information for us about what tsarnaev actually did and raise and shed some light on
. >> let's talk about the issue a lot of people have been talking about. not everybody, but some. miranda rights. we've watched enough detective shows no know, police shows, they give miranda rights almost like blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. it's done. why do you think that's an issue? now we just got the word as we went on the air tonight the defendant here, the suspect, i guess he's a defendant now, has been given his miranda rights. >> this is truly something of an urban legend. people like to watch shows where a criminal goes free because he wasn't given miranda rights. that's extremely rare. i do criminal defense work. i can tell you, the most you can hope for in a miranda case is one or two statements will not make it into court. it's rare the whole case falls out unless everything -- >> so it's not the poison fruit thing? >> there is a poison fruit provision, standard. but it's very rare for it to pollute an entire case. >> let me ask you practically, why don't the law enforcement officials, the federal officials up there who have him in custody at the hospital, why didn't they just
whether he should be read his miranda rights. >> you're giving them the option, as to whether or not they want to cooperate and i don't believe they should have that option. this is sole will i for the purpose of interrogation to find intelligence to get the intelligence that i believe we need. >> questions remain -- did the brothers have help in carrying out their attacks? >> we're satisfied that the two actors here, the two people that were committing the damage have either been arrested or killed. and the people of the city of boston can rest comfortably at this point in time. >>> but did the fbi miss warning signs after interviewing 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011? where did the brothers get their guns? their training? and their inspiration? >>> in washington, the boston terror attack could become an excuse to slow down immigration reform. >> if ways to improve the bill offered amendment when we start mark-up in may and let's vote on it. i say that particularly those pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as a -- i would say excuse for not doing th
enforcement. we know that doesn't quite work for several reasons. one, there is an exception in the miranda rights. when a suspect is read their rights by the police, we're talking about a miranda warning. there is a provision that allows in case law that allows for law enforcement to wait if they think there is a national security threat or a danger to the public until they've talked to the person and established there isn't a danger to the public or gotten the information they need. then they can read the miranda rights. that's what the fbi has done in this case. that's what they did in the new york time square bomber. that worked quite well. they talk to him for a while before they read him his rights. then they read him his rights. he kept and he provided very valuable information. we know that the traditional civilian court system founded by the founding fathers can work in this situation. >> let me ask you a couple questions. if the russian government was so concerned about tamerlan as to alert our fbi and our government, and warrant an investigation of him, why are we so sure that dz
will question him without reading him his miranda rights. we're getting a look at the suspect this morning, a video of tsarnaev, taken during a 2009 wrestling tournament. he's the one wearing the black wrestling uniform there. >>> also, a congressional aide is telling the "boston globe" oversight committees are seeking intelligence or the lack thereof leading up to the boston marathon bombing. for more on the investigation i'm joined by nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff. a good sunday morning to you, mi michael. what are we hearing about the time line when tsarnaev may be charged and the charges he is facing? >> reporter: well, we could see charges against tsarnaev as early as today. i know that federal prosecutors are were preparing them yesterday. actually, we've been told they might come late yesterday afternoon or even last night. they didn't. so it's possible we may now see them this morning. now what that would consist of is not an actual indictment but a criminal complaint backed up by an affidavit most likely from an fbi agent that should have addition a
by federal authorities. but in the beginning, he will not be given the usual miranda warning about the right to remain silent. instead, the government will invoke a rule that allows questioning a suspect without giving advice of rights. >> there is a public safety exemption in cases of national security, and central charges involving acts of terrorism, and so government has that opportunity right now. >> the government invoked that same rule in the case of the so-called underwear bomber. as in his case, it allows questioning to learn of any potential plots or accomplices that could present a continuing threat. >> the first questions the fbi will focus on are specific threats that he might be aware of. likely, are there any other improvised explosive devices? were there other people working in the network? the sorts of things that go directly to whether or not there's a continuing threat to public safety. >> reporter: he'll face charges brought by the justice department, because terrorism is a federal crime with a trial in a regular civilian court. and as in other high profile terrorism cases
controversy over miranda rights now pretty much moot. he's been read his rights. he has a lawyer. so that -- that part of the controversy seems to be -- that part of the issue seems to be put aside at this moment. >> let me go to don, michael. when you read the complaint and it says about their homemade bombs, let's go back to what michael was just talking about in the ieds. the complaint says they threw at least two small improvised explosive devices, ieds, out of the car and intact low-grade device was discovered inside the car in addition from the scene of the shootout. the fbi has recovered two unexploded ieds as well as the remnants of numerous exploded ieds. now, does this say to you, when we read numerous exploded ieds, does that support the idea that they planned more attacks to you, don? >> well, you know, al, i think right off the bat, when you look at this circumstance here, clearly this was a planned attack. it not only was a planned attack by the activities that they went about, but if you go back and look, years and months gone back at how these people operated and so o
today at his hospital bedside and read his miranda rights, that was an important moment in this test. because while there is more to this test than this moment, we did learn in this moment they are going to try this guy according to our laws and values, as a sloppy criminal he is alleged to be. joining me at the table the ferelli. it's great to have you both here. so i refer to unnamed troll, republican senators who were calling for enemy combatant to be applied to this 19-year-old suspect. i want to play a little bit of sound from senator lindsey graham who was probably the most outspoken about this. take a listen. >> i believe our nation is at war. the enemy is radical islam, defined as the taliban, al qaeda, and affiliated groups. the question i have regarding this case is there any association between these two individuals and the groups i just named to allow enemy combatant status to be conferred upon the suspect in boston. >> don, you and i were talking about this a lot last week as the investigation was unfolding. >> right. >> what is your reaction to that? >> i -- it seems to
not get his miranda rights. >> among of group of republicans calling for the boston bombing suspect to be considered an enemy combatant. that means he would not have the same constitutional protection as a regular citizen, with regard to what he says as the investigation moves forward. will this happen? california congressman, a senior member of the intelligence committee. congressman, always good to see you. i know that you disagree with the congressman and think that the suspect is in custody. is entitled to his miranda rights. why? >> well, i think the administration is handling it exactly correct. there is a public safety exception under the miranda allowing law enforcement to interview him, making sure there are no other bombs, threats, perpetrators still out there giving the law enforcement flexibility to do the that prior to miranda and i think the court will interpret it broadly and give them the time they need to make sure that the public is safe. after that, he will have to be mirandized, doesn't mean the end of cooperation, but no basis yet to conclude they should be trea
okayed the suspension of the suspect's miranda rights. is that a temporary suspension? >> reporter: yes, by law it is. it's called the public safety exception to the miranda rule. normally you have to tell someone they have a right to remain silent and if you don't, then you can't use anything they tell you in court. so that's why the miranda warning is given. but there is an exception. you don't have to do it if there's a possible threat to public safety. and here obviously there's a concern about whether there are potential accomplices. investigators say they haven't found any. or other explosives. they say they haven't found any of those either but that's what they want to ask him. and this exception probably begins to expire the moment you invoke it so it's probably no good for more than a day or two but nonetheless they can do that. afterwards they'll have to give him his miranda warning and say whether he'll continue to answer questions. the justice department says even in very serious cases like this, most people in custody do continue to talk. >> pete, who's going to be interrog
's before he gets the miranda rights. the fact that he can't speak right now, does that push back that window of time because they're not getting anything from him? >> that's a good question that i won't speculate on without a legal background. i'll leave that one up to the master pete williams. but i can imagine there's got to be some sort of gray area there that some lawyer could look at. on that point, though, i think it's interesting, where we've gone now from, alex, is we've gone from this, all right, what exactly happened, to these real sort of questions surrounding the national security of this country, and how exactly these two individuals were able to go forward with what they ultimately accomplished. so this morning, sort of around that point, talking to folks related to the house homeland security committee, they say they really want to sort of get this investigation rolling on why these two individuals seem to have slipped through the u.s. intelligence community, especially after that information reported yesterday that the russians were concerned about the older broth
of gunfire. >> no miranda warning? >> the fbi may want to explain that, it is a federal issue. >> had the boat been searched earlier? >> just a minute, we are going to finish the question. >> no, it did not. >> there was no miranda warning, they were claiming public safety exception. could we get explanation? >> there's public safety in cases of national security and involving acts of terrorism. the government has that opportunity, right now i believe the suspect has been taken to a hospital. we start with there. thank you. >> i'm sorry? >> will you seek the federal death penalty? >> you know, what i indicated earlier is that this is still an active, on-going investigation. we're going to be reviewing all of the evidence, before that kind of decision is made in terms of whether or not to seek the death penalty, you review all of the evidence and it is a very thoughtful, long process that is engaged and it is the attorney general of department of justice that makes that final decision. >> i'm sorry. karen? >> can you or colonel alben talk about what happened when you were on the scene,
/11 of last year. should he be given miranda rights? should he be treated as an enemy combatant? that debate has started. give me the facts, first, what they'll do. >> this administration has made a policy decision here. first, that's number one. secondly, he cannot be tried as an enemy combatant in a military tribunal, because that law was changed by the national defense authorization act of 2012 that says you can't do that to an american citizen. what some advocates, republicans, are saying such as lindsey graham are -- we understand he's going to be tried in civilian court, but start the questioning. treat him as an enemy combatant under the law of war. question him by intelligence people. get all the intel you can. then turn him over to the civilian authorities. that's what they advocate. that's not going to happen, the administration has decided. he'll be questioned first by this special group set up in the last couple of years in terror cases called the high value detainee interrogation group, fbi, cia, dod. they will question him without giving him a miranda warning. r they don't have
time now we have a suspect who already was read his miranda rights. he already have a lawyer present. and i don't think that should affect any trained interrogator, any trained interviewer in doing their job. we have been doing this for many, many years. we did it against terrorist suspects, organized crimes, people who are charged with treason, spies, and it always worked, and it always gets the intended results. >> in terms of this breaking news that we've just got tonight. again, this is a senior government official saying that the initial interrogation of dzhokhar tsarnaev in his hospital bed, he says that he and his brother were not in touch with any overseas terrorists or groups. they conceived the attack on their own, motivated he told them by religious fervor. that's the language that i have been given. how -- how should that be approached in terms of strategically trying to unwind any threats that might exist beyond these young men? they're saying they acted alone. but presumably, the thing that made them want to do this could make other people want to do this as well. >> su
to give him a miranda warning. >> which deals with public security threat. do investigators have a good handle, pete, on how big an arsenal they had? >> you know, we have heard conflicting things about this. we know they had a lot of finished bombs because they threw a lot of them out of the car as the police were chasing them thursday night, friday morning. they were throwing these little homemade hand grenades they had out and another pressure cooker device although it wasn't a fully finished one because we heard accounts that they lit it, which is different than the one set off on the two at the boston marathon. so they had seven, eight explosives. how many guns they had is unclear at this point. >> apparently they were using at least one or two of them in that friday night shootout. we're getting new details about how all of that went down. is it right that tamerlan got out of the car. he apparently approached police with a gun. they take him down but then he was still alive and his brother ran him over? >> that's correct. may have dragged him for a short time as well. >> presumably
administration has agreed to delay a reading of his miranda rights under a public safety exemption, secretary of defense chuck hagel has not seen evidence to link the bombings to terror groups. scrutiny turns to the fbi who reportedly questioned the older brother tamerlan in 2011 at the request of a foreign government. this is so interesting. of russia. the fbi told the a.p. despite interviewing him and relatives they did not find any activity. the agency dropped the ball. richard, i wonder if there is going to be a lot of questions and maybe even hearings out of this or what comes to mind just knowing those basic facts? >> there probably will be hearings of the fbi whether it learned more or could have done more. critics say that is monday morning quarterbacking. it ought to be about what we were talking about, what can we do to prevent or identify young people who are radicalized and how did we respond and how what did we learn about lockdowns. as the military would say it ought not to just focus on fbi. it's much bigger and much broader. we have to learn a lot from this. the reason is this
news tsarnaev will not be given a miranda warning when he's physically able to be interrogated after receiving medical treatment. instead, the official says the government will invoke a legal rule known as the public safety exception. that will allow investigators to question tsarnaev without first advising him of his right to remain silent and be afforded legal counsel. president obama used his weekly address today to praise law enforcement and those involved in tracking tsarnaev down. >> americans refused to be terrorized. ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week. that's what will remain, the stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, generosity, and love. >> authorities caught up with the suspect after a tip from a watertown resident. he was hiding in a boat parked outside a home. he is now in a boston hospital and nbc's ron allen is joining me from there. ron, with a good afternoon to you, let's get the very latest on his condition. are you getting word from the hospital or are they staying somewhat silent on that? >> reporter: absolutely silent, alex.
this person without reading miranda rights because -- >> you're saying in foreign custody? >> even in u.s. custody there are situations now where a lot of people would say, you don't need to read miranda rights right away. this decision -- if a very strong suspect is picked up or somebody could provide significant information, i think that decision, whether or not to mirandize could be -- >> presumably as the fbi is going through this, they are looking to make sure there are no secondary attacks, first priority, right, imminent threat. >> absolutely. >> and second of all, to make sure they maintain the possibility of ultimately getting a criminal conviction? >> absolutely. >> joining us is an eyewitness to the bombing. he ran the marathon and was in the medical tent when the explosions happened. joining us by phone from boston. describe what you were doing in the medical tent at what time and what the scene there was like. >> yeah. the first thing, this was wave three, so i was running -- i was a charity runner, so we started at approximately 10:40 a.m. then i finished just under four,
charges carry the death penalty as a maximum sentence. tsarnaev was read his miranda rights in a brief bedside session in the intensive care unit at boston's beth israel hospital. the appearance began when a magistrate judge asked a doctor whether he was alert saying you can rouse him. according to a transcript of the appearance, tsarnaev nodded for times to questions but spoke just one word. when asked can you afford a lawyer, he answered simply -- no. the government says it has photographic evidence placing tsarnaev and his brother at the scene of the bombings as well as physical evidence tying them to the attacks. in the complaint the fbi says that at 2:38 p.m. on the day of the bombings, 11 minutes before the first bomb went off, a surveillance camera shows dzhokhar and tamerlan tsarnaev walking toward the boston marathon finish line with backpacks. then a surveillance camera mounted on the restaurant nearby captures crucial pieces of evidence. seven minutes before the first bombing the video which still hasn't been released shows dzhokhar walking toward the second bombing site. th
to see his miranda rights read to him in bed. it's laughable. >> the enemy is radical islam. >> i'd waterboard him, myself. >>> you are about to look live at a press conference in boston. where governor deval patrick and mayor thomas menino are about to speak about the formation and purpose of the one fund boston campaign. designed to assist those who are affected by last week's bomb attacks. this takes place as dzhokhar tsarnaev lies in a hospital bed facing charges. his condition now reported as fair. more than a week after the bombing, 45 of the scores of wounded remain hospitalized, and at least 13 have lost limbs. for the victims, the physical and emotional toll comes with a very real financial one as well. massive bills for trauma care, prosthetic limbs and even home modifications. not to mention, lengthy physical rehab and psychological counseling. as such, one fund boston is stepping in to help. already raising over $10 million for victims and their families. and while the injured struggle with recovery, the families of those killed in the bombing are facing their own stag
yet to be charged in connection with the attack or been notified of his miranda rights, however, this morning officials tell nbc news he's awake and using pen and paper to answer questions from investigators. all of this as the fbi says it has obtained surveillance footage showing tsarnaev putting down his backpack near the finish line just minutes before the explosion. massachusetts governor deval patrick says he's been briefed on the footage. >> the suspect took the backpack off, put it down, did not react when the first explosion went off and then moved away from the backpack in time for the second explosion, so pretty clear about his involvement and pretty chilling, frankly. >> all right, so while we wait on that video, i want you to look at these new infrared images released showing the final intense moments of the manhunt. stun grenades just exploded as police moved in to capture the 19-year-old, and it capped a nearly four-day search for dzhokhar and his older brother, tamerlan, and while the nation was reeling, we are getting word this morning that the brothers actually
by a military tribunal and not read his miranda rights. yes, susan collins, a voice of reason and bipartisan reason. telling reporters that if the person apprehended happens to be a foreign national -- what a disgrace and what an insult to the american system of justice. and what ignorance. the fifth amendment of the constitution which protects the right to due process is quite clear about who it applies to. it reads no person shall be held to answer for capital or otherwise infamous crime unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury. nor be deprived of life, liberty of process. not no citizen, no person. french national is arrested in a bar fight, he gets access to a lawyer, is arraigned, charged and tried. we don't have some special carve out in the law for foreigners. our laws are our laws. and yet 12 years after the horrors of 9/11, we created a new special carved out area of law. we have a republican rushing to repeat the same mistakes, to place the perpetrators outside of our normal league system. susan collins should take the time to read the report. it is a useful, timely re
part and parcel of the story, and i think also we would have heard pre-miranda whether or not during the public safety exception if he had provided any information about imminent threat, additional plans, additional co-conspirators. because we haven't heard from any government sources on it, we should conclude there was nothing else in terms of imminent threat. the next step is to get all of the statements from tsarnaev and then corroborate them. to corroborate them through into good intelligence work, through question and answering with russian intelligence, going through the computers, the phone records to see if what tsarnaev has said now in a hospital bed tracks with the other information we're going to be able to uncover. >> roger, how does it track with the fact that these guys were so inadequately supported that here they are doing a carjacking, grabbing a guy, try to get him to go to the atm, because whatever money they've had has been spent on fire power and pressure cookers and they don't have enough money to get out of town. >> so what is also part of the narrative that re
tsarnaev was read his miranda rights and nodded yet. the only word he spoke other than that was no when asked if he can afford a lawyer. congress will be briefed today. the complaint says when the first bomb went off every head turned towards the explosion except for tsarnaev. he walks away without his nap sack. tsarnaev told investigators he and his brother acted alone prompted by their religion and learned how to make bombs on the internet. one friend of the brother says they are shocked they are suspects. >> they never showed signs of any violence or wanting to harm people. they were great members of our society. i remember a great friendly giant. he cared for people. more on the reserved side. they respected life at one point and i don't know what happened. >> joining me from boston is michael tracking the new leads and joining the fvgz former white house counter terrorism official, an nbc analyst. it is good to have you here. i think you can hear what the mom is saying and also what friends are saying. i want to start with you because we have homeland security secr
there are situations now where a lot of people are saying you don't need to read the miranda rights right away. if is strong suspect is picked up, or could provide significant information, i think that addition could be discussed between doj, fbi, the white house -- >> presumably as the fbi is going through this, they are looking to make sure no secondary attacks is the first priority, and then to make sure they maintain the possibility of getting ultimately a criminal conviction. >> absolutely. >> joining us now is an eyewitness, greg, ran the marathon and was in the medical tent with the explosions happened. he joins us by phone from boston. greg, zwrieb describe what you were doing in the medical tent at what time and what the scene there was like. >> yeah, the first thing to share, this was wave three, so i was a charity runner for the alzheim alzheimer's association. we started at 10:40 a.m., and i finished my first under four. hi pushed pretty hard in mile 25 and 26, what that means i was winded and dizzy, i was ready to faint. as i crossed the finish line one i asked for medical assista
now has closed that limited scope that they were able to focus on before reading him his miranda rights? >> not necessarily. that could go independently. i guess now that they've had this initial appearance, i suppose that's a fair assumption. it isn't automatic but that's probably right. >> what about michael isikoff, our colleague is reporting that i.c.e. homeland security has focused on new bedford, massachusetts and two individuals were taken in for immigration violations and they apparently are friends of tamerlan tsarnaev. can you tell me any more about that? >> these are people, i presume he is talking about people detained in new bedford, massachusetts on friday evening. the fbi has been trying to investigate whether they had any knowledge of this. whether they had any role in it. they seem to have concluded that they don't. but they're being held for now on immigration charges pending further investigation. >> and before i let you go, i know you have more to cover. 2009, this police report of tamerlan tsarnaev being arrested on domestic violence allegations. that has bee
yesterday applauding the suspension of miranda rights for the teenage suspect. he even suggested we haven't gone far enough. and advocated for labeling the suspect an enemy combatant. by defining this week's events as terrorism, we endow the violence with political meaning. when we call their homemade bombs but not adam lanza's bush master xm 15 rifle weapons of mass destruction, we sent out a trajectory for the prosecution when we focus on months that one suspect spent overseas rather than the years that both spent in the u.s. we assume a limited geography for the incubation of evil. so here we go. the crisis is over and the politics begin. folks, this is actually the most dangerous part. with me at the table today is msnbc contributor and georgetown university professor, michael eric dyson. valerie core, a writer and fi filmmak filmmaker. co-host of the cycle and robert pape, director of the project security and -- >> bb, let me start with you. what do you think happened this week? >> what i think happened is we had homegrown terrorism come to the united states. since 9/11, this is the
but say they were not in contact with overseas terror groups. he was read his miranda rights during an initial court appearance from the hospital that gives the suspect access to a lawyer. and means he will not be tried as an enemy combatant. described as a possible gun shot wound to the hand, the 19-year-old has been described as cooperative during questioning, forced to write his answers or nod yes or no. he told investigators that he and his brother came up with the attacks on their own finding internet resources to learn how to make bombs. he's been assigned three public defenders and could very well face the death penalty. a weekend search of dzhokhar's dorm room turned up a black jacket and white hat, similar to the surveillance photos. investigators also want to question tsarnaev's wife. she later converted to islam, dropped out of college and had a child with him. her attorney has said she had no suspicions that her husband might be plotting an attack. meanwhile, hundreds of people stood in silence at 2:50 p.m. one week after the bombings. president obama marked the moment o
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